Difference between revisions of "When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking"

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'''"When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking"''' is a spelling rule used when teaching English speaking children that says that when there are two vowels in a word the first one has the so-called "long" sound of the vowel (or alphabet name), and the second one is not pronounced.
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'''"When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking"''' is a spelling rule used when teaching English-speaking children that says that when there are two vowels in a word the first one has the so-called "long" sound of the vowel (or alphabet name), and the second one is not pronounced.
  
 
For example, in ''train'' the ''a'' has the [[so-called “long” a|so-called “long” ''a'']] sound and ''i'' does not sound. The same happens for ''each'', ''die'', ''goat'', and ''rescue''.
 
For example, in ''train'' the ''a'' has the [[so-called “long” a|so-called “long” ''a'']] sound and ''i'' does not sound. The same happens for ''each'', ''die'', ''goat'', and ''rescue''.

Revision as of 14:25, 19 November 2013

"When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking" is a spelling rule used when teaching English-speaking children that says that when there are two vowels in a word the first one has the so-called "long" sound of the vowel (or alphabet name), and the second one is not pronounced.

For example, in train the a has the so-called “long” a sound and i does not sound. The same happens for each, die, goat, and rescue.

Unfortunately, this rule is false 60% of the time.[1] Counterexamples: head, chief, pause, out, biscuit.

References

  1. All about Learning Press, When Two Vowels Go Walking