Difference between revisions of "Talk:Plagiarism"

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:4. open the email you sent yourself - I`d imagine that`s one of numerous ways it can be done.
 
:4. open the email you sent yourself - I`d imagine that`s one of numerous ways it can be done.
 
:--[[User:Jameson2000ad|Jameson2000ad]] 21:27, 26 November 2012 (CST)
 
:--[[User:Jameson2000ad|Jameson2000ad]] 21:27, 26 November 2012 (CST)
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::I figured that was what you meant by a sticky - it's just that it might be a little small for all the things you suggest. :-)
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::There are a few ways to work with translation programmes.  I mention some of them [[Translation as a career | here]].  As a test I've just taken a paragraph at random from [http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2012/11/26/actualidad/1353961099_810931.html this article] in a Spanish newspaper.  And the translation follows:
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::''Margallo's silence does not respond only to a diplomatic exercise of discretion. Government sources admit that the government has not yet agreed on the decision trickiest foreign policy that has had to take Mariano Rajoy since arriving in La Moncloa.''
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::You can kind of figure out what it means, but it's hardly "phenomenal".  You or I could take that text and fix it up so that it would read very well, but in order to make the necessary corrections you'd already need to have pretty high-level english skills.--[[User:Bob M|Bob M]] 03:24, 27 November 2012 (CST)

Revision as of 09:24, 27 November 2012

I'm afraid that I don't understand "Ratification sticky" section.

Is the idea that the student has written their own work in one language and then used a translation programme on it to produce a "phenomenal result" in the target language? If so I have two problems. Firstly, that's not exactly "plagiarism" - though I'm not sure what the description for that would be. Secondly, I've yet to use a translation programme which comes anything close to "phenomenal".

Furthermore, I'm also not exactly sure of the size and form of the "ratification sticky" is this a post-it note or something more substantial? The name implies one thing but the list of exercises implies something else.

Sorry if I seem hyper-critical - I'm just trying to understand the section.--Bob M 08:44, 24 November 2012 (CST)

No problem Bob M; as for the sticky query, take a look here: [[1]]
Re the translation, you are right: translation isn`t plagiarism so I have rephrased the explanation - hopefully it`s clearer now. I`m not sure I agree with you about your take on translation programs, and here`s a webquest that will prove my point(assuming you are living abroad):
1. go into a net cafe and browse the web using Google Chrome
2. log into your email account and send yourself a sentence by email
3. once you`ve sent it, change the browser configuration to "always translate this page"
4. open the email you sent yourself - I`d imagine that`s one of numerous ways it can be done.
--Jameson2000ad 21:27, 26 November 2012 (CST)
I figured that was what you meant by a sticky - it's just that it might be a little small for all the things you suggest. :-)
There are a few ways to work with translation programmes. I mention some of them here. As a test I've just taken a paragraph at random from this article in a Spanish newspaper. And the translation follows:
Margallo's silence does not respond only to a diplomatic exercise of discretion. Government sources admit that the government has not yet agreed on the decision trickiest foreign policy that has had to take Mariano Rajoy since arriving in La Moncloa.
You can kind of figure out what it means, but it's hardly "phenomenal". You or I could take that text and fix it up so that it would read very well, but in order to make the necessary corrections you'd already need to have pretty high-level english skills.--Bob M 03:24, 27 November 2012 (CST)