Difference between revisions of "Stress-timed language"

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A '''stress-timed language''' is a [[language]] in which the language [[stress]] falls on the content words of the language - the [[noun]]s, [[verb]]s, [[adjective]]s and adverbs. The other parts of speech - [[conjunction]]s, [[pronoun]]s, [[modal verb]]s etc are reduced to [[weak form]]s in order to not disrupt the flow of the stress timing.
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A '''stress-timed language''' is [[a language]] in which the language [[stress]] falls on the [[content word]]s of the language - the [[noun]]s, [[verb]]s, [[adjective]]s and [[adverb]]s. The other parts of speech - [[conjunction]]s, [[pronoun]]s, [[modal verb]]s etc are reduced to [[weak form]]s in order to not disrupt the flow of the stress timing.
  
[[Standard English]] is a stress-timed language, although the degree of stress-timing may vary with the [[accent]] used.  For example, [[Noah Webster]]'s influence may have resulted in [[General American]] possibly being less stress-timed than [[British English]].  
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[[Standard English]] is a stress-timed language, although the degree of stress-timing may vary with the [[accent]] used.  For example, [[Noah Webster]]'s influence may have resulted in [[General American]] perhaps being less stress-timed than [[British English]].  
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Currently the difference between a stress-timed language and a [[syllable-timed language]] is regarded to be a perception rather that a reality.<ref>Elsevier, [https://books.google.com/books?id=F2SRqDzB50wC&pg=PA328 Concise Encyclopedia of Languages of the World], pp. 328-329.</ref><ref>Wikipedia, [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isochrony Isochrony]. Retrieved 20 April 2016.</ref>
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
<references/>
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<references/>[[category:index]]
 
 
==See also==
 
*[[Syllable-timed language]]
 
 
 
{{stub}}
 
  
  
[[Category:pronunciation]]
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[[category:pronunciation]]

Latest revision as of 10:58, 29 April 2020

A stress-timed language is a language in which the language stress falls on the content words of the language - the nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs. The other parts of speech - conjunctions, pronouns, modal verbs etc are reduced to weak forms in order to not disrupt the flow of the stress timing.

Standard English is a stress-timed language, although the degree of stress-timing may vary with the accent used. For example, Noah Webster's influence may have resulted in General American perhaps being less stress-timed than British English.

Currently the difference between a stress-timed language and a syllable-timed language is regarded to be a perception rather that a reality.[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. Elsevier, Concise Encyclopedia of Languages of the World, pp. 328-329.
  2. Wikipedia, Isochrony. Retrieved 20 April 2016.