Difference between revisions of "Noun phrase"

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A '''noun phrase''' (/naʊn freɪz/) is a [[phrase]] with a [[noun]] as its [[head]].
 
A '''noun phrase''' (/naʊn freɪz/) is a [[phrase]] with a [[noun]] as its [[head]].
  
For example, in the sentence ''The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog'' the subject is ''the quick brown fox'' and the object is ''the lazy dog''. Noun phrases can be used as nouns. For example ''I saw the quick brown fox'' or ''The lazy dog ate a chicken''.
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In [[English]] there are two types of noun phrases; [[bare noun phrase]]s and [[determined noun phrase]]s.
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For example, in the sentence ''A quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog'', determined noun phrases are ''a quick brown fox'' and ''the lazy dog'', while ''quick brown fox'' and ''lazy dog'' are bare noun phrases.
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A [[bare noun phrase]] lacks a [[determiner slot]] whereas a determined noun phrase has a determiner slot.  However, the determiner slot in a determined noun phrase may be an [[empty slot]] ([[null element]]).  The test therefore is not whether a noun phrase has a determiner but whether a determiner can be added.  A [[pronoun]] can act as the head of a determined noun phrase but not as the head of a bare noun phrase.
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A determined noun phrase consists of either (1) a [[determiner]] and a [[bare noun phrase]] and associated elements, or (2) a pronoun and associated elements.
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== References ==
 
== References ==
<references/>
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<references/>[[category:index]]
  
  
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[[category:Nouns|Phrases]]
 
[[category:Nouns|Phrases]]
[[Category:Phrases]]
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[[category:phrases]]

Latest revision as of 11:02, 23 November 2020

A noun phrase (/naʊn freɪz/) is a phrase with a noun as its head.

In English there are two types of noun phrases; bare noun phrases and determined noun phrases.

For example, in the sentence A quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog, determined noun phrases are a quick brown fox and the lazy dog, while quick brown fox and lazy dog are bare noun phrases.

A bare noun phrase lacks a determiner slot whereas a determined noun phrase has a determiner slot. However, the determiner slot in a determined noun phrase may be an empty slot (null element). The test therefore is not whether a noun phrase has a determiner but whether a determiner can be added. A pronoun can act as the head of a determined noun phrase but not as the head of a bare noun phrase.


A determined noun phrase consists of either (1) a determiner and a bare noun phrase and associated elements, or (2) a pronoun and associated elements.


References[edit]