Difference between revisions of "Adverb of place"

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An '''adverb of place''' is an [[adverb]] that refers to [[place]].
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An '''adverb of place''' is an [[adverb]] that refers to [[place]]; they are single-word [[place adverbial]]s.
  
Common adverbs include "here", "there", etc
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Common adverbs include "here", "there"; these are locative adverbs.
  
Adverb phrases usually include the prepositions "[[in]]" or "[[at]]", such as "I live in London", "The Magna Carta was signed at Runnymede."
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These are often [[compound]]s of a [[preposition]] and a [[noun]], particularly "in"/"out", "up"/"down", "over"/"under", giving e.g. "indoors", "outdoors", "inside", "outside", "overground", "underground" (wombling free), "upstairs", "downstairs", "downtown", "uptown", etc.
 
 
 
 
These are often [[compound]]s of a [[preposition]] and a [[noun]], such as "indoors", "outdoors", "inside", "outside", "upstairs", "downstairs", "downtown", "uptown".
 
  
 
"[[Home]]" is a special case; it is often an adverb of place, as in "I'm going home"; <sup>#</sup>"I'm going to home", which students often say, may be grammatically correct, but is semantically unusual.  Whereas "I'm home" and "I'm at home" are both OK.  But we say "I'm eating at home" not *"I'm eating home".
 
"[[Home]]" is a special case; it is often an adverb of place, as in "I'm going home"; <sup>#</sup>"I'm going to home", which students often say, may be grammatically correct, but is semantically unusual.  Whereas "I'm home" and "I'm at home" are both OK.  But we say "I'm eating at home" not *"I'm eating home".
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There may not be a complete distinction between an adverb of place and a [[adverb of movement]].
 
There may not be a complete distinction between an adverb of place and a [[adverb of movement]].
  
 
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[[category:Adverbs|Place]]
 
[[category:Adverbs|Place]]

Latest revision as of 16:20, 4 December 2019

An adverb of place is an adverb that refers to place; they are single-word place adverbials.

Common adverbs include "here", "there"; these are locative adverbs.

These are often compounds of a preposition and a noun, particularly "in"/"out", "up"/"down", "over"/"under", giving e.g. "indoors", "outdoors", "inside", "outside", "overground", "underground" (wombling free), "upstairs", "downstairs", "downtown", "uptown", etc.

"Home" is a special case; it is often an adverb of place, as in "I'm going home"; #"I'm going to home", which students often say, may be grammatically correct, but is semantically unusual. Whereas "I'm home" and "I'm at home" are both OK. But we say "I'm eating at home" not *"I'm eating home".

There may not be a complete distinction between an adverb of place and a adverb of movement.