Decoding exercises: "ch"

From Teflpedia

ʃ

chef /ʃef/

k

choir /ˈkwaɪər/

chair /tʃeər/

In English "ch" normally corresponds to the IPA phonetic symbol /tʃ/ in words like "church" or "match". Many words have "ch" sounding /k/ (such as choir, of Greek origin) and words derived from French may have a /ʃ/ sound, such as champagne.

IPA vowels
æ ɑː
trap father - start
e
dress face square
ɪ ɪə
kit fleece near
ɒ əʊ ɔː
lot goat taught
ʊ ʊə
foot goose mature
juː jʊə
cute cure
ʌ ə ɜː
strut comma nurse
ɔɪ
price mouth choice
IPA consonants
Normal sound: /b, d, f, g, h, k, l, m, n, p, r, s, t, v, w, z/
 ʃ  ŋ
show church sing
ʒ  j 
usual judge you
θ ð s
think that see
IPA Stress
ˈ Primary stress
hotel /həʊˈtel/
ˌ Secondary stress
understand
/ˌʌndərˈstænd/
IPA Syllabification
. nitrate /ˈnaɪ.treɪt/, night-rate /ˈnaɪt.reɪt/

As /tʃ/[edit]

  • as "ch": approach - beach - chair - challenge - change - charity - cheap - check - chief - child - choice - choose - church - each - launch - lunch - much - purchase - reach - research - rich - search - speech - teacher - touch - which
  • as "tch": catch - kitchen - match - pitch - stretch - switch - watch

As /k/[edit]

  • anchor - architecture - archive - chaos - character - charisma - chemical - chemistry - choir - Christian - Christopher - chrome - echo - headache - mechanism - Michael - orchestra - psychology - scheduleAmE - scheme - school - stomach - technique - technology
Variant spellings
  • mic - mike (truncations of "michrophone")

As /ʃ/[edit]

  • brochure - champagne - chauffeur - chef - Chicago - machine - Michelle - Michigan - moustacheBrE - mustacheAmE - parachute - scheduleBrE

Homophones: cache - cash

Silent "ch"[edit]

  • silent "ch": yacht /jɒt/

Variant pronunciations[edit]

  • schedule: /ˈʃedjuːl,BrE ˈskedʒuːlAmE/

As /dʒ/[edit]

  • sandwich: /ˈsænwɪtʃ, ˈsænwɪdʒBrE/
  • spinach: /ˈspɪnɪtʃ, ˈspɪnɪdʒBrE/
  • Greenwich /ˈgrɪnɪdʒ, ˈgrɪnɪtʃ, ˈgrenɪtʃ, ˈgrenɪdʒ/
  • Norwich /ˈnɒrɪdʒ, ˈnɒrɪtʃ/

Anticipated pronunciation difficulties depending on L1[edit]

Preconceived ideas and other interferences from L1 obviously interfere in many cases with how students perceive - and pronounce - sounds/words in English. The following section aims to point out some of the most typical difficulties teachers and students may encounter regarding pronunciation.

Spanish[edit]

Many Spanish speakers will pronounce "ch" just like in Spanish, i.e. /tʃ/. This is particularly true of /ʃ/ (as in champagne) because this sound does not exist in Spanish.

See also[edit]

References[edit]


External links[edit]