Concord

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Concord, also known as agreement, refers to the need, or not, for words in the same sentence to relate to each other, grammatically, i.e. in number, gender,[1] person or case.[2]

It can apply to the following:

  • a) a subject and its verb; * "Every one of us have a role to play ..." President Bill Clinton, State of the Union Address, 23 Jan. 1996.[2] should be: "Every one of us has a role to play ..."
  • b) a noun and its pronoun; * "You can only teach a person something if that person can comprehend and use what is being taught to them." J.M. Balkin, "Turandot's Victory", 2 Yale J. Law & Humanities 299, 302 (1990)[2] should be: "You can only teach a person something if that person can comprehend and use what is being taught."
  • c) a subject and its complement;
  • d) a noun and its appositive;
  • e) a relative pronoun and its antecedent;
  • f) an adjective and its noun.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. "agreement" Collins Dictionaries
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Garner, B. Garner's Modern American Usage, p 178. (2009) Oxford University Press. Google eBook

External links[edit]


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